Metal Roofing Conceptions You Shouldn’t Believe

From 2016 to 2026, the employment of US roofers is predicted to grow by an impressive 11 percent. Clearly, we need reliable roofs on our homes and businesses in order to protect our families, our employees, and our possessions.

But roofing has changed quite a lot over the years. The asphalt shingle, arguably the most prevalent roofing material in Western culture, first appeared right around the turn of the 20th century. Since that time, composite and natural materials have found their way onto countless roofs. But roofs made out of metal are one of the more intriguing advancements in this sector.

But despite all of the advantages metal roofing can offer, you might be surprised by the falsehoods that follow this material around. Let’s highlight and dispel some of the most common misconceptions about metal roofs.

Misconception: Metal roofs are noisy

There’s a pervasive idea that the sound of rain falling on a metal roof is deafeningly loud. The sound of something aggressively hitting onto a metal object can be quite jarring, but that’s not what you will experience when you have a metal roof.

If a rainstorm comes through, you actually won’t hear anything more than what you’d experience with any other type of roof. When properly installed by metal roofing Ontario specialists, you’ll have a solid substrate and attic insulation to provide a sound barrier. In some cases, metal roofs can actually subdue these stormy sounds.

Misconception: A metal roof won’t complement my home

While this may have been potentially true at one time, metal roofing has evolved significantly in recent years. There are now more colors and styles of metal roofing materials available than ever before. There are even options that perfectly mimic the look of other in-demand roofing options, such as slate and clay tile.

Even if you go the traditional metal roofing route, its visual appeal can be an asset, as potential homebuyers will have their interests piqued. More than likely, your roofing contractor can find a metal roofing option that will be a perfect match for your home’s aesthetic.

Misconception: Metal roofing attracts lightning

A lot of people are under the impression that a metal roof attracts lightning, which would understandably be a safety concern. However, this is simply not true. Metal roofing is no more likely to attract lightning than any other roof, because it’s not grounded (a requirement for any lightning strike).

In fact, because metal roofs are noncombustible and electrical conductors, they may actually be a better construction option to reduce damage from lightning strikes. That’s because it transmits the energy from the lightning over a larger area and reduces the heat transferred into the building itself, meaning that the risk of fire damage is reduced.

Misconception: A metal roof will be too heavy

You might assume that metal materials aren’t lightweight enough for your home. Believe it or not, metal is typically one of the lightest roofing materials on the market. According to calculations, aluminum roofing materials weigh only 50 pounds per square, while traditional shingles can weigh anywhere from 200 to 500 pounds per square.

Subsequently, metal roofing can often be installed on top of an existing roof without damaging the structural integrity of a home. If your home can handle traditional shingles, it won’t have any problem supporting metal roofing.

Although metal roofs may seem a bit unconventional at first, they bring a lot of benefits. For one thing, they can increase a home’s resale value from one to six percent, as compared to an asphalt shingle roof. What’s more, you could recoup anywhere from 85.9 percent to 95.5 percent of the costs associated with installation upon selling your home outfitted with a metal roof.

You’ll also end up saving a substantial amount on your monthly bills, as this energy efficient roofing option can help to offset your heating and cooling costs. The peace of mind they provide is often well worth the financial investment.

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